Finale (Canterbury Shaker Village, Pt. 10)

My farewell message written for the Canterbury Shaker Village April 2018 newsletter at the conclusion of my collections internship there.

Interning here at Canterbury Shaker Village has been an incredible experience. In the past year since graduating, I’ve had the chance to learn about handling objects at one internship, handle reproductions of objects as a costumed interpreter at another, and here I’ve finally had the chance to actually handle the old stuff on a daily basis.

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Chairs my fellow intern and I chose to represent the Canterbury Shakers’ twentieth-century consumerism in our exhibit on Shaker furniture.

It has been such a treat to work with so many different kinds of objects – bonnets, spinning wheels, chairs, scrapbooks – and to experience the wonder of considering the lives they have been a part of before now. I have learned so much about museum work while cataloging, putting together an exhibit, and moving objects as we reinterpret different museum spaces.

1950s Dining Table at Canterbury Shaker Village

One of the dining tables we set up after a photograph of the sisters dining in the 1950s. I also got to be a handywoman, putting the tables back together after we brought them out of storage!

When my fellow intern and I put all of the chairs we picked out in the Carriage House exhibit case, I have to admit I teared up a little. As frustrating as it can be to keep track of all the little pieces of an exhibit, it’s so satisfying to produce something and help the objects tell their stories.

Victory Garden Cabinet

A cabinet used to store canned goods, some of which were made by the sisters using vegetables harvested from their extensive Victory Gardens during World War II. We were delighted to open this up and find chalk writing on the interior with the dates different things had been canned.

It has been fascinating to learn more about this unique community and hear stories about the sisters of the twentieth century who founded the museum. I’ll never forget being moved to tears on two separate occasions by the narratives I’ve heard here. Once was when I saw a video of Alberta Kirkpatrick tell about coming to Canterbury as a scared orphan and being greeted by Marguerite Frost running down to meet her.

Canterbury Shaker Village Meetinghouse at Sunset

The beauty of the landscape at Canterbury will be something I always remember. I especially loved seeing the different colors of the sunset every evening.

Another was at Shaker Spotlight, watching Tom Davenport and Frank DeCola’s documentary on the Shakers, hearing Eldress Marguerite Frost comment about talk of disbanding the Shakers: “But I don’t want to go anywhere . . . If this is what you’re going to accept, although it means everybody goes the other way, you have to go on. It’s not easy, and I wouldn’t have anyone think it is. But they shouldn’t accept the charge and start on the way unless they’re determined to go through with it.”

Eldress Marguerite Frost of Canterbury Shaker Village

A newspaper clipping about Sister Marguerite Frost, one of the last Shaker sisters at Canterbury in the late twentieth century who I found particularly endearing.

Marguerite’s words resonate with me as I move forward to start my adult life. Whatever path you take, it’s important to put your heart into your work and commit to whatever cause you take up. The Shakers are an example of two things I value highly: working hard and showing kindness. I know that their legacy and my experience here will continue to have an impact on me for a long time yet.

Canterbury Shaker Village

I’ll always remember coming around the bend in the road and seeing this sign and the village up on the hill before me…My heart swelled. I leaved behind so many memories here.


Other posts to peruse:

Furniture: History for your Hiney (The Canterbury Tales, Part 9)

What it takes to create a museum exhibit (The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 8)

Antique Bandboxes: The original Shabby Chic (The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 7)

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Linoleum

When I first walked into my “home-away-from-home” bedroom in the historic Trustees’ Office at Canterbury Shaker Village, I was very excited at the fascinating geometric pattern decorating my floor.

Antique linoleum at Canterbury Shaker Village

Don’t get me wrong, I love a good hardwood floor as much as the next HGTV junkie, but in recent years, it’s become my dream to have a floorcloth – a canvas floor covering painted with a design – a la eighteenth or early nineteenth-century mansions I visit. I assumed that the thing covering my floor was some variation on a floorcloth, so I was completely psyched! To my dismay and confusion, I found out on my first day working that it was linoleum.

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North Shop

This completely baffled me since I associate linoleum with hard tiles placed in a mosaic pattern. What was on my floor – and countless others throughout the buildings in the village – was a large sheet that had the appearance of being painted. Turns out this sort of linoleum wasn’t so different from floorcloths in concept – it’s essentially canvas with linseed oil, resin, perhaps cork and other mineral fillers with pigments for decoration.

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North Shop

I still can’t reconcile these incredible decorative items with the nondescript blah-colored tiles in my bathroom, but both Shaker historic linoleum and modern stuff was installed for the same reason – functionality. Easy to clean, water-resistant, simple to care for, durable — much more practical overall than those wood floors my mother trained us not to spill or track in any kind of water onto. Judging my how much linoleum has survived in Canterbury, I guess the Shakers were onto something.

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Trustees’ Office

What astonished me most though were just how many patterns I encountered. One building could have several different patterns throughout. I only managed to capture a mere fraction of the patterns I saw, but I wanted to share some of what I did manage to snap pictures of on here…Enjoy!

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Dwellinghouse

Vintage Linoleum

Dwellinghouse

Vintage linoleum

Dwellinghouse

Vintage Linoleum

Dwellinghouse

Vintage Linoleum

Dwellinghouse

Vintage Linoleum

Dwellinghouse

Vintage Linoleum

Dwellinghouse

Vintage Linoleum

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Antique Linoleum

Dwellinghouse

Antique Linoleum

Infirmary

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Infirmary

Antique linoleum

Trustees’ Office


Other posts you might enjoy:

What it takes to create a museum exhibit (The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 8)

Antique Bandboxes: The original Shabby Chic (The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 7)

This Old House (The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 5)

Furniture: History for your Hiney (The Canterbury Tales, Part 9)

This was originally written for the Canterbury Shaker Village Facebook Page, published on March 10, 2018.

The Shakers are famous for their furniture. In fact, coming into this internship at Canterbury Shaker Village, that was one of the few things I knew about them. I’ve never been interested in furniture, so I was a little nervous when I found out that my fellow intern Kira and I were going to be curating an exhibit on chairs as part of the new furniture exhibition we’re helping the staff here put together.

But as I entered one after another of the museum’s countless artifact storage rooms and saw the vast array of chairs, tables, desks, bureaus, and cupboards that made up the very fabric of the Shakers’ existence over two centuries, I quickly became compelled by their beauty and significance. It’s hard not to respect the straight lines and simple elegance of the traditional Shaker ladderback chairs, but it’s also fun to come across completely unexpected pieces the Shakers bought in later years in accordance with what was fashionable for their times: fanciful Victorian wicker furniture, striped reclining lawn chairs, and bulky mint green pleather rockers.

Furniture is something we easily take for granted – it fades into the background of our lives as we work through the issues that arise each day – but if you think about it, furniture makes up the set of the stage on which we play out our lives. Just like a theater set can affect the mood of a play, I think the type of furniture that surrounds us must shape our lives in subtle but profound ways that I’m excited to ponder as I research our exhibit.

Shaker Museum


Other posts to peruse:

The Canterbury Tales: The Power of Historic Objects

The Canterbury Tales Pt. 3: #Blessed by Shaker Built-Ins

A Legacy in Hallmark Cards: The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 4

This Old House: The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 5

What it takes to create a museum exhibit (The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 8)

This is a longer version of a post written as part of my collections internship at Canterbury Shaker Village for their Facebook Page, published on March 17, 2018.

Visiting museums is one of my favorite hobbies, and working at museums makes me think about them in a whole new light. As my coworkers and I here at Canterbury Shaker Village are doubling down on putting together a new exhibit on furniture made and owned by the Canterbury Shakers – “Furnished by Faith: Shaker Stories in Wood” – I’ve been thinking a lot about all the tough decisions that go into crafting a museum exhibition. There is so much to consider.

Shaker Furniture on Exhibit

Shaker-made cupboard over drawers and blanket chest that will be part of our exhibit at Canterbury Shaker Village.

First off the big questions: What story do you want to tell? What artifacts do you have to display? What information will visitors find interesting? But then there’s the nitty gritty questions: What fits into the exhibit space? We had a couple chairs we were dying to display, but they were an inch or two too tall to fit into our chair display case. What objects have research done on them already? With such an expansive collection as we are lucky to have at CSV, sometimes we don’t know the date an item was made or who made it, which can make it hard to interpret in an exhibit.

Shaker Chairs on Exhibit at Canterbury Shaker Village

A panoramic of our chair case, part of our larger furniture exhibit. We were lucky that we found a lot of chairs that we loved that fit in the 43-inch tall case…some beloved chairs from the collection were simply too big to include, however.

These questions can open up whole new avenues for research that, while fascinating, you sometimes don’t have enough time to pursue when you’re under the pressure of a deadline. Recently, we’ve been trying to find out more about an adult cradle in our collection that we want to exhibit. It can be baffling to realize something that has been interpreted for years may not have very much information out there about it.

Shaker Antique Furniture on Exhibit at Canterbury Shaker Village

The adult cradle, to the left, is one item that sent us into a research rabbit hole.

In addition, there’s also the difficulty of moving items to go on exhibit. My fellow intern and I have been joking that we’ve really been building our upper body strength during the internship as we move furniture pieces back and forth between buildings – a task New Hampshire weather does not really try to cooperate with us on! In the end, a moving company had to be hired for a lot of the large pieces, but this can cost a pretty penny. Not to mention that every time an artifact is moved, it is put in danger of being damaged. Accidents can happen, especially after a long day of trying to maneuver huge two-hundred year-old pieces around tight corners and through tiny doorways.

Shaker Furniture

This large piece can no longer be moved because it was taken apart too many times to be moved to different exhibits, leaving it in a fragile state. Essentially you would have to design an exhibit around this piece!

There’s also the consideration of the condition objects are in: something may be an extraordinary example of a particular style of craftsmanship, for instance, but that often means that it’s been displayed on exhibit before many times. It’s important to give objects rest in humidity, temperature, and light-controlled archival storage so that they don’t get too faded by light or damaged by the wear and tear that comes from being on display – visitors who ignore the “Do not touch” signs, the stress that hanging can put on textiles, the occasional outbreak to bugs that eat textiles, the exposure of metal objects to things in the air that oxidize them, etc.

Taped Shaker Rocking Chair Seat

This mismatched woven cloth tape seat is not the prime example of a Shaker-made rocker people might expect to see on exhibit, but we decided to give the most-loved examples a rest from being on exhibit. Plus, we thought this told an interesting story about seats being repaired and altered over time.

Oftentimes what has been on exhibit is the best set of examples in a collection with the most research done on them, but it’s important to give them a rest – and to let other objects in the collection have their time in the spotlight, even if it means working a little harder to tell their story or upsetting some people who want to see “the classics”.

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Shaker chairs and stools all ready to be on exhibit.

Lastly, there are considerations of how visitors will interact with the exhibit and text. What questions do you want visitors to consider? What do you want them to learn? What myths do people commonly believe about your topic that you hope to dispel? Are you repeating the same themes too much or are they not clear enough? Are your main points clear? Is there too much text? Too little? In what order will a visitor walk through the room and read the labels? Are objects too easy for a visitor to touch or – heaven forbid – walk off with? Is the exhibit accessible to people in wheelchairs or with sight or hearing difficulties?

Shaker Sewing Desks

Two Shaker sewing desks that will be on exhibit. We had to consider which way the platform should be oriented for the most visual appeal and to prevent the platform from getting in the way of visitors.

Are there places where it would be easy for someone to trip or knock into something? Are there going to be events held in the space? There are so many more questions, but I’ll leave it off there. At the end of the day (and the opening of the exhibit), what matters is that we, as museum workers, are doing our utmost to be good stewards of the objects and stories in our collection by keeping in mind how to best preserve them in as good condition as possible for future generation while allowing them to tell the many stories wrapped up inside to as many visitors as possible through clear, engaging interpretation.

Preparing museum exhibit

Yours truly getting down and dirty spackling the exhibit case.


Other posts to peruse:

This Old House: The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 5

Victorian Furniture in a Shaker Village (The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 6)

Antique Bandboxes: The original Shabby Chic (The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 7)

Antique Bandboxes: The original Shabby Chic (The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 7)

This was originally written as part of my collections internship at Canterbury Shaker Village for their Facebook Page, published on March 28, 2018.

As my time here at Canterbury Shaker Village is coming to an end, I have to say that one of the greatest parts about being here has been the chance to interact with such a wide variety of historic objects. In the morning I might carry a two hundred-year-old chair to storage while in the afternoon I might catalog a scrapbook that’s only about as old as I am! It reminds me of the breadth of the history of Canterbury — it’s not all about century or another — and the huge variety of objects that make up our modern life.

Antique Objects

A sample of the interesting assortment of objects here at the museum…We took all of these things off exhibit — they range from classic Shaker-made wooden oval boxes on the left to dumbbells for gym class at the school the Shakers ran, schoolbooks, objects meant to be sketched by students in art (the dinosaur egg-looking things) to card and word games (in the cardboard boxes). (Canterbury Shaker Village collections)

One really charming set of artifacts I came across recently were some bandboxes being stored in the North Shop. With such sweet designs, it’s hard for a floral-lover like myself not to immediately be drawn to these objects. I first read about bandboxes while working at Historic Deerfield last summer and immediately fell in love with their practical design and adorable exteriors. They’re similar in structure to hat boxes, would have typically been made out of cardboard and usually were covered with leftover wallpaper, which was becoming all the rage in the 1800s. (They remind me a lot of today’s “Shabby Chic” aesthetic!)

Antique Bandboxes

Bandboxes — sometimes bought, sometimes made at least partially at home — were widely used for storage and travel in the 1800s. I got to experience this firsthand while working in costume in a house at Old Sturbridge Village, a living history museum set in the 1830s, where we would keep our silverware and sewing supplies in bandboxes, highlighting to me that they were both decorative and functional, cheaper alternatives to wood or metal.

 

Finally, the other week, I felt like my museum experience came full circle while transporting CSV’s Shaker-owned bandboxes to storage: it’s one thing to read about an item, another to use it, and another to care for it in its old age. Each experience gave me a new perspective on the object, taught me the place it had in people’s lives in the past, and pushed me to think about how we can appreciate them today.

Historic Bandboxes

In a world where we have an entire store chain dedicated to containers but also a growing DIY movement to craft, decorate, and “upcycle” objects for the home, I could easily see bandboxes coming back into style!

Antique Bandboxes


Other posts to peruse:

Victorian Furniture in a Shaker Village (The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 6)

This Old House: The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 5

A Legacy in Hallmark Cards: The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 4

Victorian Furniture in a Shaker Village (The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 6)

This was originally written as part of my collections internship at Canterbury Shaker Village for their Facebook Page, published on March 10, 2018.

While all eras of American history intrigue me, one that I find the most intriguing is the Victorian era. In particular, I find Victorian architecture and design very endearing. I love the whimsical, jumbled aesthetic of turrets and wraparound porches on Queen Anne homes and the strange combination of dramatic angles and sharply-cut florals on Eastlake-style furniture.

Antiques on a Ladies' Dressing Table

A Shaker-made wooden carrier basket coexists with Victorian knicknacks in a room of the Dwellinghouse, the equivalent of a Shaker dormitory, at Canterbury Shaker Village.

While many condemn the Victorians for their seemingly tasteless clutter, I find it a very relatable testament to a human desire to surround ourselves with sentimental knick knacks that remind us of places we’ve been, people we’ve known, and events we’ve experienced. I was delighted to find that even the Shakers at Canterbury were swept up in the fever of Victorian decorating.

Victorian Shaker Bedroom

In a room upstairs in the Syrup Shop used by one sister to paint in, traditional bulbous Shaker-style drawer pulls were replaced with (at the time) more fashionable pulls resembling giant hexagonal beads that dangle from a bronze bracket like earrings.

Victorian Drawer Pulls

Not to mention the proliferation of distinctly Victorian dressers, clocks, rocking chairs, framed Bible verse prints, bed frames, and more…all featuring floral designs, of course!

Victorian Motto and Nightgown on Shaker Pegs

Antique Victorian Eastlake Floral Chest of Drawers

They’re visually fascinating pieces and serve as an interesting reminder that even the Shakers were not immune to wanting to get in on the latest trends…and I just feel happy seeing them! 

Architectural remnants trellis and screen door

Architectural remnants (now in storage) that once decorated the buildings at Canterbury – a trellis for growing ivy that was on the porch of the Trustees’ building and a screen door.


Other posts to peruse:

The Canterbury Tales, Part 1: Prelude

The Canterbury Tales: The Power of Historic Objects

The Canterbury Tales Pt. 3: #Blessed by Shaker Built-Ins

This Old House (The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 5)

This was originally written for the Canterbury Shaker Village Facebook Page, published on February 26, 2018.

One exciting part of my internship at Canterbury Shaker Village has been the chance to live and work in a historic building. When I first walked into the Trustees’ Office – once upon a time the building where Shakers conducted business with the outside world, sold products they created, and hosted guests to stay – I was in awe of its massive antique cabinets, shiny vintage radiators, and elegantly curved wood banisters.

Canterbury Shaker Village Trustees' Office

Old homes certainly have their quirks though, and I could barely sleep the first night because of all the bizarre whistling and banging noises I later learned were to blame on those vintage radiators. Now that I’m used to it, however, I revel in the chance to occupy a space that has known so much history over the past two centuries.

Trustees' Office at Canterbury Shaker Village

After I interned with a historic preservation organization, I became very passionate about the idea of reusing historic spaces – I think it’s important to give them new life in order to allow them to keep telling their story and fulfilling the purpose for which they were made.

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Now, as I read a book of memoirs, Simple Gifts, written by Shaker scholar June Spriggs about her time as a 19 year-old working as a tour guide at the Village and living with the last Shaker sisters here, I delight in her stories of eating dinner in the Trustees’ Office with the last Canterbury sisters, I feel even more impacted by how I am part of a constellation of lives that have intersected in this building.

Trustees' Office at Canterbury Shaker Village

Parts of our stories are similar – I relate so much to Sprigg’s tales of being young and unsure of myself – while other parts are different – obviously I’m not an elderly Shaker sister! But living under the same roof as these other women who I will never know makes me appreciate and commemorate their lives in a way I couldn’t before.

Canterbury Shaker Village

Trustees' Office at Canterbury Shaker Village


Other posts to peruse:

The Canterbury Tales, Part 1: Prelude

The Canterbury Tales: The Power of Historic Objects

The Canterbury Tales Pt. 3: #Blessed by Shaker Built-Ins

A Legacy in Hallmark Cards: The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 4

Why it’s worth studying history

As much as I love history, every job has its ups and downs. Today was a particularly exhausting day of work and by the time 5pm rolled around, I felt like I needed to get out of the house. I drove 20 minutes to the outlets for a little “retail therapy” and cheese fries. It was pitch black by the time I got on the road again.

Canterbury Shaker Village at Sunset

As I headed home, pine trees rising up on either side of me, my high beams lighting up an occasional moose figurine-topped mailbox along the road, I put on a CD I grew up with: “Who Am I” by Scottish singer-songwriter Dougie Maclean. As a track rolled around to a song about Scottish people emigrating to America because of a famine, I started to get emotional. It hit me that I myself was driving through the land that my ancestors who came from Scotland settled.

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I was driving through the land of the people who came before me, making it possible for me to have the life I do, while listening to music passed on to me by my parents, who learned it from my grandfather. I was struck by how, no matter where we wander, we carry with us so much of not just our own past but also that of those who came before us.

Country road in winter

With that, it’s worth taking time to get in touch with what came before us, so we can remember what sacrifices have been made as well as what mistakes. Even though working in history can have its frustrations, tonight reminded me that it also is a responsibility to tell people’s stories, to commemorate, and to give the people of today context for their lives and where they came from.  When you realize you’re part of a long line of folks, it’s humbling and empowering, which is why it’s important to tell more people’s stories when we teach history.

Historic buildings at sunset


Other posts to peruse:

The Canterbury Tales: The Power of Historic Objects

The Canterbury Tales Pt. 3: #Blessed by Shaker Built-Ins

Forgotten Buildings, Forgotten People

A Legacy in Hallmark Cards: The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 4

This was originally written for the Canterbury Shaker Village Facebook Page, published on February 11, 2018.

This week I had the pleasure of going through a scrapbook in the museum collections that was created by a friend of the last Shaker sisters who lived in the Shaker community in Canterbury, NH until the last woman passed in 1992. This woman grew up visiting the sisters with her mother and created a scrapbook of greeting cards the sisters sent her, guidebooks from the village’s early days as a new museum, and newspaper clippings of any and every article published about the Shakers.

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From the collections of Canterbury Shakers Village (2018.2.1)

I love scrapbooks — they’re such a personal documentation of memory, untainted by outside editing, giving voice to anyone with paste and scissors. They tell a person’s story using the very material they collected from their daily life, broadening our understanding of history beyond just those who had enough social clout to publish books. This particular scrapbook reveals how much affection the creator had for the Shaker sisters, demonstrated by the amount of care and attention that went into collecting, saving, and assembling the objects within. The fact that someone would save everything the Sisters sent to her and seek out clippings elsewhere that related to them speaks loudly to the legacy they left, the imprint they had.

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A spread of the scrapbook, feature newspaper articles about two of the sisters’ funerals and freeting cards from another sister. (Canterbury Shaker Village collections 2018.4.1)

Turning the pages of the scrapbook, the legacy of Canterbury became very real to me; when I came to a page documenting one of the last sisters’ passing, I started to tear up. I was struck by the sacrifice, hard work, and love that these last sisters put into continuing the legacy of their faith and community by forming a museum here. It’s easy for the individual personalities of the Shaker community to get lost in obsessions over the craftsmanship of their furniture or arguments over whose scholarship of them is the best.

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Greeting cards sent from one sister to the creator of the scrapbook alongside clippings of pictures of Shaker-made furniture from an antiques auction catalog. (Canterbury Shaker Village collections 2018.2.1)

Seeing that they sent Hallmark cards on birthdays is a reminder that they weren’t a bunch of dour members of an odd religious order — they were human, loving and caring as they believed God called them to. And hurting as well. It’s interesting how many of the Shakers – particularly the women – were handed off to the community by new stepmothers who didn’t want them or other similarly traumatic stories.

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A photograph of one sister, Gertrude Soule, from one of the newspaper clippings in the scrapbook. (Canterbury Shaker Village collections 2018.2.1)

Working here at the museum commemorating the Shakers who lived in Canterbury, NH, hearing stories and seeing objects like this scrapbook has made it clear to me that these women made a profound impact on everyone whose paths crossed with theirs. I feel honored to be a part of helping to continue their legacy as I work here, and inspired seeing from their example that living a life faithful to your convictions and conscious of the needs of others can make a tremendous impact, even if the acts seem small.

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A greeting card in the scrapbook. (Canterbury Shaker Village collections 2018.2.1)


Other posts to peruse:

The Canterbury Tales, Part 1: Prelude

The Canterbury Tales: The Power of Historic Objects

The Canterbury Tales Pt. 3: #Blessed by Shaker Built-Ins

Party Like It’s 1838: Old Sturbridge Village Internship (Pt. 1)

#Blessed by Shaker Built-Ins (The Canterbury Tales Pt. 3)

Written for the Canterbury Shaker Village Facebook page on February 3, 2018, this is a short report on my experience as a Collections Intern at the Village:

Getting to know the Village the past two weeks, I’ve been intrigued by the number of built-in storage units I’ve encountered in the museum buildings, including in my own room in the Trustees’ Building. Being a bit of a clotheshorse, I can never find enough places to store my clothing at home. I was delighted when I moved in to see that not only was there a huge built-in cabinet and drawer set, but also pegs lining three of my walls, very convenient for hanging clothes.

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The Trustees’ Office, Canterbury Shaker Village (photo by Rebecca Gale)

One of the most impressive things I’ve come across thus far in the Village is the giant hallway of built-in storage in the Dwelling House. Being the modern materialist that I am, I wouldn’t mind having a walk-in closet that big for myself, but the Shakers valued simplicity, efficiency, and community, and this storage is a testament to that: enough storage in one place to provide for the entire village.

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The style and functionality of these built-ins speaks to the Shakers’ taste for simplicity, order, and cleanliness. Pegs could be used to hang chairs, brooms, or whatever was needed, opening up spaces for community gatherings. And today I feel linked to the past as I use these handcrafted features for my own belongings, a demonstration of the Shakers’ enduring legacy through their handiwork.

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Other posts you might be interested in:

The Canterbury Tales, Part 1: Prelude

The Canterbury Tales: The Power of Historic Objects

This Old House: The Canterbury Tales, Pt. 5